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The Society of Folk Dance Historians (SFDH)

El Costiller

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BACKGROUND

Information: This is a dance game.

Translation: The high-level official (who accompanied the king when he went to his chapel, visited a church, or went on a trip).

Pronunciation: ehl kohs-TEE-yar

Other names: Children's Folk Dances, Andre Van De Plas, 1994.

Region: Chile, South America

Meter: 6/8

Formation: Three bottles are placed in a straight line on the ground. Children line up on opposite ends, e.g., lines of three – boys on one side, girls on the other.


DESCRIPTION

The children skip through the bottle line, on the right hand side of the first bottle, left hand side of the second and right side of the last bottle. This also happens from the opposite direction at the same time.

After every verse, the music accelerates and the bottles are placed a little bit closer to one another. This is repeated 3 times. The idea is to keep the bottles standing up. You can decide on an interesting penalty if somebody knocks over a bottle.


LYRICS

// El Costillar es mio, //
Me lo quieren quitar.
Que culpa tiene naiden
Con mi costillar.
      The Costillar is mine,
They want to take it from me.
Nobody is to blame
For this.

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