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Pirin

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Pirin

BACKGROUND

Information: Pirin Macedonia is the smallest part of the geographical region of Macedonia located on the Balkan Peninsula, today in southwestern Bulgaria. This region coincides with the borders of the Blagoevgrad Oblast (province), adding the surrounding area of the Barakovo village from the Kyustendil Province. After World War I, Strumica and the surrounding area were broken away from the region and were ceded to Yugoslavia.

Pirin covers an area of about 4,225 square miles which is 10.18% of the geographical region Macedonia. One of the regional centers is Blagoevgrad, also known as Gorna Dzumaya, the old name of the city. The region is bordering with Kyustendil Province and Sofia Province on the north, Pazardžik Province and Smolyan Province on the east, Greece on the south, and North Macedonia on the west.

The name of this region comes from the Pirin Mountains which are spread in the central part of Pirin Macedonia. The mountain name Pirin comes from Perun, the highest god of the Slavic pantheon and the god of thunder and lightning. In the antiquity the range was called Orbelos by the Thracians, meaning "snow-white mountain" in Thracian language.

Pirin usually refers to the part of the region of Macedonia attributed to the Kingdom of Bulgaria by the Treaty of Bucharest (1913). Until World War I, the region included the areas present-day Strumica and Novo Selo Municipality, today in North Macedonia. After World War I, they were broken away from Bulgaria and ceded to Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

The Balkan Wars of 1912–1913 saw the annexation of the area to the Bulgarian state. Before the wars, it had been under Ottoman rule for over five centuries.


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